Archive: Stories by Mary Ellen Gabriel

Imagine a sharper, more detailed image of plant cell walls than this already-incredible view provided by the current Zeiss confocal microscope. A single optical section is shown 
on the left with the 3D reconstruction of multiple sections on the 
right. (Image courtesy Department of Botany)

Partnerships in science: Botany lights way for new microscope

This summer, a new state-of-the-art Zeiss Elyra system, including a 780-confocal laser scanning microscope, will arrive at the Newcomb Imaging Center. The new microscope is extra-sensitive, extra-fast, and will shape the questions scientists ask about how cells multiply, respond to stimuli, grow, adapt, and die. More »

Taylor Hanley is a senior majoring in communication arts and psychology. She's using her 2013 Hilldale Award for Undergraduate Research to study why users feel sick while experiencing 3-D simulations. (Photos by Sarah Morton, College of Letters & Science)

Why does virtual reality make us sick? Undergraduate investigates

Senior Taylor Hanley is using her Hilldale Award for Undergraduate Research to examine why immersive 3-D causes motion sickness. More »

St. Basil's Cathedral in Moscow overlooks Red Square in Moscow. (Photo courtesy iStock)

Russian law’s chilling effect on UW-Madison scholars

The country’s much-discussed anti-gay legislation could affect how students in UW-Madison’s relatively new Russian Flagship Program experience their year in St. Petersburg. More »

Q&AWordpressMain_Fall2013 - wtext

Up at the plate: New sports historian

Sean Dinces, the first Allan H. “Bud” Selig Professor of History, will launch sports history as a field of study at UW-Madison. More »

Zebrafish swim in their tank in the lab of Mary Halloran and Yevgenya Grinblat. (Photo by Nazan Gillie, Department of Zoology)

Fishing for clues about brain development

Zebrafish embryos give zoology faculty members Mary Halloran and Yevgenya Grinblat an extraordinary view of genes performing highly specialized functions that result in the construction of a healthy brain. More »

Harold Scheub joined the faculty of the Department of African Languages and Literature in 1970, after completing his Ph.D. at UW-Madison. (Photo by Jeff Miller, University Communications)

Storied professor Scheub retires after 43 years

Professor Harold Scheub, who taught the well-known course The African Storyteller, collected stories while traveling the African countryside as a doctoral student in the 1960s. More »

"You see it in the blue books, if you wrote questions poorly," says Assistant Professor of Communication Arts Eric Hoyt, pictured with teaching assistant Olivia Conti. "You wonder, why did I make them go through this?" (Sarah Morton, College of Letters & Science)

Exam jitters? Professors battle test anxiety, too

Students aren’t alone when it comes to exam nerves. Turns out some professors grapple with worry and angst at test time, too. More »

Orhan Pamuk, author of Snow and winner of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Literature, speaks at the Great World Texts student conference Monday at Union South. (Photos by Sarah Morton, College of Letters & Science)

Helping teachers bring world literature to high school students

The Great World Texts program, an outreach initiative of UW-Madison’s Center for the Humanities, expands students’ social, political and cultural perspectives. More »

The birch bark canoe is known as wiigwaasi-jiimaan in Ojibwe. (Jeff Miller, University Communications)

Ojibwe birch bark canoe launches in Lake Mendota

L&S students, under the direction of Professor Tom DuBois, chronicled the building of the canoe. More »

The UW-Madison mock trial team celebrates its first-place finish at the American Mock Trial Association tournament in October at Bradley University in Peoria, Ill.

Spirited arguments: Mock trial teams win in every way

First place says a lot — but first place and a sportsmanship award says it all. UW-Madison’s mock trial teams work hard and have fun, too. More »